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Nutritional Coaching

The Tabata Method burns fat better than any other method, which is why a balanced and healthy diet is an essential condition for lasting success. Proper nutrition provides the body with the necessary nutrients it needs before, during and after training.
A combination of long-chain carbohydrates, high-quality proteins and fats is ideal. insaturées.

Nutrition for weight loss
In general, we always recommend a healthy and balanced diet. It is therefore important to eat a variety of foods to ingest all the macro and micronutrients* necessary for the proper functioning of our body.
The combination of nutrient-rich and energy-poor products is ideal, e.g. vegetables and wholegrain foods.
Oils, fats and sweet foods should be consumed in great moderation.
To lose weight successfully, it is necessary to have a good caloric deficit: you must consume fewer calories than your overall need.
On the other hand, since your body uses energy even at rest, you should never consume fewer calories than you need. your basal metabolic rate*.
With the correct caloric deficit, adapted to your training objective and physical activity, you will achieve a sustainable and healthy weight loss.


To calculate and know precisely your calorie requirement for weight loss.
Click on the following link  https://www.foodspring.fr/calcul-calories

Important

To avoid the yo-yo effect, do not reduce your calorie requirement by more than 500 kcal. 


- Food program: nutritional distribution
.
1 .Protein: 1.8 to 2.3 grams per kilo of weight
2. carbohydrates: 1 to 2 grams per kilo of weight
Lipids: about 1 gram per kilo of weight.

• Typical day of a diet program to lose weight
What might your weight loss program look like?
Using a typical day, we show you how to reach the number of calories needed for weight loss and monitor the distribution of macronutrients (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids).

Example calculation with a 25 year old man measuring 1.80 m and weighing 80 kg. He has been practicing a strength sport for 2 months, 2 to 3 times a week.
Her daily requirement for weight loss is 1 800 calories with the following nutritional distribution:
540 calories of carbohydrates (30% of the daily balance) = 130 grams
630 calories of protein (35% of the daily balance) = 150 grams
630 calories of fat (35% of the daily balance) = 70 grams

Breakfast
(434 calories: lipids 17.5 g, carbohydrates 31.3 g, protein 34.4 g)
Shake composed of :
- 300 ml of water
- 1 apple
- 150 g berries mix
- 30 g peanut butter bio
- 30 g plain yoghurt (0% fat)

Lunch

(377 calories: lipids 3.1 g, carbohydrates 39.8 g, protein 45.7 g)
- 200g of wild salmon (or 200g of tempeh)
- 250 g of potatoes
- 200 g of asparagus

Snacks
(500 to 600 calories)
- Rice cakes with a little honey
- Fruit and/or fruit salad
- Mix of dried fruits / almonds / cashews
- Protein bar

Dinner
(434 calories: lipids 17.5 g, carbohydrates 3.8 g, protein 78.8 g)
- 250 g of sliced turkey (or 2 vegetal steaks of 100g + 100g of red beans)
- 125 g of mozzarella
- Mixed peppers


macro and micronutrients*

1. Good sources of lipids 

 Peanut oil, walnut oil, coconut oil, olive oil, avocado, flax seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews and pistachios.
2. Good sources of protein 
- Low-fat dairy products (cottage cheese, cheese, yoghurt)
- Low-fat meats (beef, chicken, turkey)
- fish (salmon, mackerel, herring)
- Vegetables (coral lentils, kidney beans, peas, quinoa, chickpeas, soy, protein flakes, chia seeds)
3. Good sources of carbohydrates
Wholegrain cereals (wholegrain rice, wholegrain pasta), oat flakes, spelt flakes, quinoa.

source : www.foodspring.com

basal metabolic rate* The basic metabolism (MB), or basal metabolic rate, corresponds to energy requirements.
The "incompressible" energy expenditure for the body, i.e. the minimum daily energy expenditure allowing the organism to survive; at rest, the organism consumes energy to maintain its functions (heart, brain, breathing, digestion, maintaining body temperature), via biochemical reactions (which use ATP). It is expressed on the basis of a day, therefore in joules or calories per day. The diet helps to meet these energy needs.

Basic metabolism depends on height, weight, age, sex and thyroid activity.
As an example, the basal metabolic rate for a 20-year-old man, measuring 1.80 m and weighing 70 kg is approximately 6300 kJ (1510 kilocalories). The basic metabolism of a 20-year-old woman, measuring 1.65 m and weighing 60 kg, is approximately 5500 kJ (1320 kilocalories).

Food to build muscle
The secret of muscle development lies in maintaining a caloric surplus.
Only an additional "caloric buffer stock" of 300 to 500 calories allows the body to gain additional muscle mass. 

-Macronutrient distribution
Calculating the amount of calories needed will define the basis of your diet to build muscle.
The next step is to weight the 3 macronutrients "proteins, lipids, carbohydrates" and understand their role in the food program.

Proteins (the bricks of the musculature)
Protein plays a key role in recovery, nutrient intake and muscle building.
We recommend an intake of 1.5 to 1,8 1.8g of protein per kilogram of weight (about 20 to 25% of the total energy content). Your muscles need protein in the form of amino acids to repair muscle fibers and form new cells.
When selecting appropriate protein sources, special attention must be paid to obtaining a healthy mix of animal and vegetable proteins. These should also have a high biological value and be very low in fat.

Examples of high quality protein sources
- Low-fat dairy products (cottage cheese, cheese, yoghurt)
- Low-fat meats (beef, chicken, turkey)
- fish (salmon, mackerel, herring)
- Vegetables (coral lentils, kidney beans, peas, quinoa, chickpeas, soy, protein flakes, chia seeds)

Carbohydrates (the fuel for your training)
Carbohydrate intake in your diet is governed by many factors. When training almost daily with intensive workouts, an adequate carbohydrate intake is imperative. Giving up carbohydrates means exposing yourself to long-term fatigue and significant power loss.
Complex carbohydrates will serve as a great energy resource for the muscles.  

Examples of high quality carbohydrate sources:
- Wholemeal products (wholemeal rice, wholemeal pasta)
- Oatmeal, spelt flakes
– Quinoa
- Rice pancakes

Lipids (for an optimal hormonal balance)
Healthy fats are often neglected in our diet. And yet, the myth that "fat would make you fat" has long been disproved.
A good intake of fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, is very important for the proper functioning of the body.
The absorption of fat conditions the level of testosterone and thus the release of growth hormones necessary for muscle building.
These good fats are found in both plant and animal sources.
For bodybuilding, we recommend 1g of fat per kilo of weight (20 to 25% of the total energy quantity).

Examples of high quality lipids sources
- Oils (hazelnut oil, walnut oil, coconut oil, olive oil)
- Avocados, linseed, sunflower seeds
- Nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, pistachios)

- Typical day of a muscle building nutrition program
What might your eating plan for building muscle look like?
Using a typical day, we show you how to reach the number of calories needed to gain muscle mass and monitor the distribution of macronutrients (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids).

Example calculation with a 26 year old man measuring 1.90 m and weighing 81 kg. He works in an office and works out 3 times a week.
His daily need to gain muscle mass is 3200 calories with the following nutritional distribution:
1760 calories of carbohydrates (55% of the daily balance) = 430 grams
640 calories of protein (20% of the daily balance) = 155 grams
800 calories of fat (25% of the daily balance) = 86 grams

First breakfast
(824 calories: fat 15.5 g, carbohydrates 119.5 g, protein 39.6 g)
- 150 g of oatmeal
- 150 g berries mix
- 100 g cottage cheese
- 15 g flax seeds

Second breakfast
(398 calories: fat 13.3 g, carbohydrates 38.5 g, protein 26.8 g)
- 2 slices of wholemeal bread
- 70 g of Gouda cheese
4 slices of cucumber

Lunch (588 calories: fat 21.5 g, carbohydrates 43.4 g, protein 54 g)
- 200 g of salmon fillet
- 150 g of brown rice
- 150 g of spinach

Snacks
(500 to 600 calories)
- Rice cakes with a little honey
- Fruit and/or fruit salad
- Mix of dried fruits / almonds / cashews
- Protein bar

Dinner
(566 calories: fat 5 g, carbohydrates 80.2 g, protein 57.8 g)

- 300 g of sweet potatoes
- 200 g of chicken fillet
- 200 g of vegetables (broccoli, carrots, cauliflower)

source : www.foodspring.com

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